Trending February 2024 # Lynx 2 Is An All # Suggested March 2024 # Top 9 Popular

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It’s no secret that the jailbreak community enjoys all-in-one jailbreak tweaks that provide more bang for the buck, and while there’s certainly no shortage of such tweaks spanning the plethora of repositories available today, not all of them are created equally. Need proof of their popularity? Just ask any veteran jailbreaker if they’ve ever heard of Springtomize before and they’ll probably say they’ve used it.

At the start of the year, we showed you Lynx by iOS developer MTAC, and it was easily one of the most comprehensive all-in-one jailbreak tweaks we’ve ever seen. Fast-forward to now, and MTAC is launching Lynx 2 with support for iOS & iPadOS 14. Best of all, this new release is available free of charge for anyone who already owns the original Lynx tweak – nifty indeed!

Just like the original tweak, Lynx 2 adds a rather expansive preference pane in the Settings app where users can configure seemingly endless options for a whole host of user interfaces found throughout Apple’s mobile operating systems:

One thing you may notice that sets Lynx 2’s preference pane apart from the original is that you can now choose between list and grid-based pane views. We really like the grid-based view, as it provides larger tap boxes and a more aesthetically pleasing appearance.

Now just as you’d come to expect from an iDownloadBlog review, we’ll be taking a deep dive into all the settings that Lynx 2 brings to the table below. We ask that you bear with us, as there’s a lot to go over:

SpringBoard

One of the most extensive preference panes offered by the Lynx 2 tweak is the one pertaining to SpringBoard. These settings apply system-wide, and here, users can:

Opt for Dark Mode to be used on a per-app basis, ignoring system settings

Opt for Light Mode to be used on a per-app basis, ignoring system settings

Tint any application interfaces you want:

Enable and choose a custom tint color

Enable and choose a custom badge tint color

Enable and choose a custom tint color for the app’s UI

Hide alert banners

Disable vibration when connecting to a power source

Lock your device when you place it face down

Hide the Dock background

Hide the Dock’s divider (iPadOS only)

Double-tap on the Home Screen to lock the device

Disable Home Screen rotation

Hide the background of open folders

Hide the title of open folders

Hide the folder’s icon background from the Home Screen

Hide separators from apps system-wide

Enable a more modern table style and choose which apps it gets applied to

Hide scroll bars system-wide

Hide search bars

Hide the search bar background

Hide the Home Bar system-wide

Hide the Home Bar from the Lock Screen only

Enable and configure a custom Home Bar height

Enable and configure a custom Home Bar width

Make Navigation Bar titles smaller

Enable Navigation Bar shadow lines

Enable and configure a custom color for toggle switches system-wide

Hide separators from alerts

Tint application Tab Bar badges to match the app it’s from

Hide labels from application Tab Bars

Enable Haptic Feedback when tapping on application Tab Bar buttons

Hide page dots

Hide the preview that appears after taking a screenshot

Disable the screenshot shutter sound

App Library

Next up is a section that Lynx users will find new since it’s unique to iOS 14: the App Library. Here, users can:

Disable the App Library on their iPhone

Automatically open the App Library in search mode

Hide the background blur effect

Hide folder/section titles

Hide the search bar blur

Hide the magnifying glass

Enable Haptic Feedback effects for when opening or closing folders/sections

Icons

The next section, Icons, pertains to the Home Screen and its app icons. Here, you will be able to:

Hide the remove stack option

Hide the configure widget option

Hide the configure stack option

Hide the edit Home Screen button

Hide ‘Share App’ from the 3D Touch/Haptic Touch menus

Hide ‘Delete App’ from the 3D Touch/Haptic Touch menus

Hide the pause download button

Hide the cancel download option

Hide the prioritize download option

Hide separators

Hide action images

Display the local IP address when looking at a 3D Touch/Haptic Touch platter

Display the battery percentage when looking at a 3D Touch/Haptic Touch platter

Hide app icon labels

Enable and configure a custom app icon label color

Hide updated app dots

Hide beta app dots

Colorize app icon badges based on the dominant color of the app’s icon

Hide icon badges altogether

Hide the text that appears within icon badges

Control Center

This section may appear more familiar to you if you’ve used the original Lynx, and it applies to iOS’ beloved Control Center interface. Here, you can configure the following options:

Disable the Control Center interface completely

Enable true Bluetooth and Wi-Fi toggles that do what they’re supposed to do instead of making the radios temporarily dormant

Hide the Camera and Microphone indicators from the Status Bar

Use rounded Control Center modules

Display percentages in the Brightness and Volume-based Control Center sliders

Hide the chevron from the Control Center interface

Widgets

If you’re looking to change the behavior of iOS’ widgets, then you’re in luck because Lynx 2 provides options for that too. Here, you may:

Hide widget labels from the Home Screen

Hide scroll dots from widgets on the Home Screen

Tap the batteries widget to enable Low Power Mode

Hide empty battery rings form the batteries widget

Hide the separator lines from the batteries widget

Hide the separator lines from the Siri widget

Lock Screen

The second most populated preference pane in the Lynx 2 tweak is the one pertaining to the Lock Screen. In this section, users can set the following options to their liking:

Enable the native MagSafe charging animation

Hide or show the Time label and configure an alpha level

Hide or show the Date label and configure an alpha level

Choose to left, center, or right-align the aforementioned label(s)

Adjust the Lock Screen Clock’s font weight

Choose between default, bold, italic, and medium font effects for the Lock Screen’s Clock

Enable and choose a custom font for the Lock Screen’s Clock

Hide the Control Center grabber from the Lock Screen

Hide the battery view from the Lock Screen

Always use the darkened Do Not Disturb style

Hide the Swipe Up/Press to Unlock text

Configure and display custom text instead Swipe Up/Press to Unlock

Show the Swipe Up/Press to Unlock or custom text immediately

Hide page dots from the Lock Screen

Hide the Lock Screen’s Do Not Disturb banner

Pull to clear notifications from the Lock Screen

Use modern icons for Lock Screen notifications

Hide swipe separators from the Lock Screen

Enter a custom notification height for the Lock Screen

Hide the cancel button from the Passcode interface

Hide the Emergency button from the Passcode interface

Hide the Backspace button from the Passcode interface

Enable Haptic Feedback when interacting with the Passcode interface

Hide the Enter Passcode text from the Passcode interface

Enable and configure custom Passcode text for the Passcode interface

Hide the Lock Screen’s Quick Actions buttons

Hide only the Flashlight button

Hide only the Camera button

Hide the Quick Actions buttons’ backgrounds

Switch between default and simple Lock Screen Music players

Hide the volume slider from the Lock Screen Music player

Hide the progress view from the Lock Screen Music player

Hide the media controls from the Lock Screen Music player

Hide the audio source button from the Lock Screen Music player

Hide the ‘No Older Notifications’ text from the Lock Screen

Use the number of notifications in place of the Notification Center text

App Switcher

If you’re interested in upgrading your iPhone or iPad’s App Switcher, then you’ll love this section. Here, you can tinker with these options:

Enable the grid-style App Switcher on iOS

Enable the page-style App Switcher on iPadOS

Hide the suggestion banner from the App Switcher

Use a 3D Touch/Haptic Touch gesture to force-quit all apps

Enable a confirmation message to ensure you want to force-quit apps

Prevent Now Playing apps from being force-quit

Disable 3D Touch/Haptic Touch gestures in the App Switcher

Status Bar

One of the last lengthy preference panes to be found in the Lynx 2 tweak has to do with the Status Bar. Here, you can:

Enable the iPad-style Status Bar on your iPhone

Hide the iPad-style Status Bar date from the iPhone

Hide the Status Bar-based Camera and Microphone indicator dots

Hide breadcrumb links from the Status Bar

Hide the Status Bar from every interface

Hide the Status Bar only from the Home Screen

Hide the Status Bar only from the Lock Screen

Hide the Status Bar’s battery indicator

Hide the Status Bar’s battery indicator bolt when charging

Display the battery percentage inside of the Status Bar’s battery indicator

Hide various indicators from the Status Bar:

Wi-Fi signal strength

Cellular signal strength

Time

Carrier text

Location Services arrow

Rotation Lock icon

Do Not Disturb indicator

Bluetooth icon

Alarm bell

Airplane Mode indicator

VPN icon

CarPlay indicator

‘Not Charging’ text

Hide the Lock icon from the Status Bar when locked

Hide colored views when providing Personal Hotspot or recording the display

Hide the pulsing view when providing Personal Hotspot or recording the display

Use Wi-Fi address instead of the carrier name

Enable and configure a custom carrier

Override the No SIM text

Override the No Service text

Use the current date as your carrier text using any format you choose

Enable and configure a custom Status Bar Time format

Settings

The Settings preference pane, perhaps unsurprisingly, pertains to the iPhone or iPad’s native Settings app. Here, you will be able to:

Enable and configure a custom Apple ID first and last name (at the top of the Settings app) individually

Hide cell icons from the Settings app

Use round cell icons in the Settings app

Hide the disclosure arrow

Hide third-party app preference panes from the Settings app

Hide COVID-19 exposure notifications

Display your network’s IP address

Music

Lynx 2 also provides a preference pane to configure a few different Music-centric options. Here, you may:

Hide the Up Next queue popup

Hide or show all recently added songs

Use a three column layout for the Music Library

Messages

In the Messages section, you can customize your iPhone or iPad’s native text messaging app. The options in this section include the following:

Hide the contact image glow effect

Enable and configure a custom char bubble color

Enable and configure a custom label color

Hide separators from the Messages app

App Store

Lynx 2 doesn’t offer much by way of App Store app configuration, but it does give you the ability to use the Updates button in the Tab Bar.

Phone

If you’re into customizing your iPhone’s native Phone app, then this will be the section for you. Here, users can configure these Phone-centric customization options:

Hide the background from the dial pad’s number buttons

Display the exact time when calls were sent or received

Choose between 12-hour or 24-hour time for the above

Hide third-party phone calls from your recent calls list

Hide the Voicemail tab from the Phone app

Hide the call button’s background

Enable and configure a custom call button color

Photos

Looking for options to customize the Photos app? If you answered yes, then you’ll appreciate this section. Here, you have the following options at your disposal:

Skip the confirmation message that asks if you’re sure you want to delete media

Enable infinite zoom for Photo Library icons

Display image metadata in the Photos app

Camera

And let’s not forget the Photos app’s cousin: the Camera app. Here, you can configure Camera-related options including:

Enable the iPad’s Camera interface style on the iPhone

Hide the most recent picture from being shown in the corner of the app

Disable the Camera app’s shutter sound

Experimental

The experimental section allows users to enable and configure miscellaneous options for iOS and iPadOS that otherwise wouldn’t have applied to any of the sections discussed above. Options here include:

Enable the notched Status Bar style on non-notched iPhones

Use a flat URL bar in the Safari app

Enable rounded screen corners and adjust the radius

Enable and configure a custom Home Screen app icon scale

Enable and configure a custom Dock scale

Enable and configure a custom App Library scale

Third Party

The last major section that Lynx 2 brings to the table is the Third Party section, and this applies to various third-party applications that you may or may not have installed from the App Store. Things you can do here include:

Hide the coin button from the Reddit app

Show the number of Likes in the Instagram app

Hide the jailbreak popup from the Zoom app

Enable a confirmation message before liking a Tweet in the Twitter app

Enable a confirmation message before Retweeting a Tweet in the Twitter app

Hide Fleets from the Twitter app

The primary preference pane of the Lynx 2 tweak also provides a toggle switch to enable or disable the entire tweak on demand and an option to reset all settings to their defaults.

As you can see for yourself, Lynx 2 is far from light on features. If you’re looking to lighten the load as far as the number of jailbreak tweaks you’ve got installed, then we’re sure that Lynx 2 could help with that by providing many of the same features that one-off tweaks like FleetingChances, NewGridSwitcher, and a wide variety of others that we just couldn’t find the room to list.

Those interested in trying Lynx 2 can purchase the tweak for just $2.00 from the Packix repository via their favorite package manager – a screaming bargain if you ask us. More importantly, the tweak is completely free if you already own the original Lynx tweak. Just remember that Lynx 2 only supports jailbroken iOS & iPadOS 14 devices, and if you’re using iOS or iPadOS 13, then you’ll need to use the original Lynx tweak instead.

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Apecoin Crypto Is All Set To Reach An Ath Before April Ends

The APE price is maintaining a notable uptrend, swinging within an ascending parallel channel.

ApeCoin is among the contemporary cryptocurrency which shook the entire crypto space with its inception a couple of days before. Like many other tokens, the APE price also smashed the highs on the very first day of its inception. However, the asset quickly plunged below US$10 for some time and rebounded firmly. Currently, the APE price is maintaining a notable uptrend, swinging within an ascending parallel channel. And hence a notable uptrend could uplift the price beyond the US$15 initially. However, another pullback may be pretty much expected as the asset smashes these levels, but could stand strong above US$18.  

Understanding ApeCoin and the ecosystem

The APE ecosystem is a community consisting of Bored Ape Yacht Club (BAYC) and Mutant Ape Yacht Club (MAYC), two of the most popular NFT collections on the Ethereum blockchain. ApeCoin (APE) is the native governance token that empowers the decentralized community of the APE ecosystem. APE has been created as the primary token for all new products and services from Yuga Labs, the company behind NFT projects. ApeCoin (APE) is the native governance token that empowers decentralized community of the APE ecosystem. It has been created as the primary token for all new products and services from Yuga Labs, an NFT projects player. Since its launch in April 2023, BAYC has become the biggest brand in the NFT world, with multi-million dollar sales. It boasts a growing list of celebrity owners including Serena Williams, Adam Draper, Eminem, and Mark Cuban.  

Price Prediction of ApeCoin in 2023

Based on how the APE token has performed in the past few weeks and the nature of its ecosystem, we are hopeful that the price of the ApeCoin can increase marginally in the coming months. There is a good chance that the ApeCoin price will increase to US$51 by the end of 2023. It is also important to state that there is a possibility that the APE coin will drop significantly in the coming weeks before picking up again.  

What Makes ApeCoin Unique?

ApeCoin is the APE Ecosystem’s governance token, allowing token holders to participate in ApeCoin DAO and giving its participants a shared and open currency that can be used without centralized intermediaries. 62% of all ApeCoin was allocated to the Ecosystem Fund, which will support community-driven initiatives as voted on by ApeCoin DAO members. ApeCoin also gives access to certain parts of the Ecosystem that are otherwise unavailable, like exclusive games and services. For third-party developers, ApeCoin is a tool to participate in the ecosystem by incorporating ApeCoin into services, games, and other projects.  

More Trending Stories 

ApeCoin is among the contemporary cryptocurrency which shook the entire crypto space with its inception a couple of days before. Like many other tokens, the APE price also smashed the highs on the very first day of its inception. However, the asset quickly plunged below US$10 for some time and rebounded firmly. Currently, the APE price is maintaining a notable uptrend, swinging within an ascending parallel channel. And hence a notable uptrend could uplift the price beyond the US$15 initially. However, another pullback may be pretty much expected as the asset smashes these levels, but could stand strong above US$18.The APE ecosystem is a community consisting of Bored Ape Yacht Club (BAYC) and Mutant Ape Yacht Club (MAYC), two of the most popular NFT collections on the Ethereum blockchain. ApeCoin (APE) is the native governance token that empowers the decentralized community of the APE ecosystem. APE has been created as the primary token for all new products and services from Yuga Labs, the company behind NFT projects. ApeCoin (APE) is the native governance token that empowers decentralized community of the APE ecosystem. It has been created as the primary token for all new products and services from Yuga Labs, an NFT projects player. Since its launch in April 2023, BAYC has become the biggest brand in the NFT world, with multi-million dollar sales. It boasts a growing list of celebrity owners including Serena Williams, Adam Draper, Eminem, and Mark Cuban.Based on how the APE token has performed in the past few weeks and the nature of its ecosystem, we are hopeful that the price of the ApeCoin can increase marginally in the coming months. There is a good chance that the ApeCoin price will increase to US$51 by the end of 2023. It is also important to state that there is a possibility that the APE coin will drop significantly in the coming weeks before picking up again.ApeCoin is the APE Ecosystem’s governance token, allowing token holders to participate in ApeCoin DAO and giving its participants a shared and open currency that can be used without centralized intermediaries. 62% of all ApeCoin was allocated to the Ecosystem Fund, which will support community-driven initiatives as voted on by ApeCoin DAO members. ApeCoin also gives access to certain parts of the Ecosystem that are otherwise unavailable, like exclusive games and services. For third-party developers, ApeCoin is a tool to participate in the ecosystem by incorporating ApeCoin into services, games, and other projects.

Xiaomi Civi 2 Is An Ideal Smartphone For Females And Selfie Lovers

Appearance

The Xiaomi Civi 2 looks as stylish as its predecessor. Moreover, it has a thickness of 7.23mm and a weight of 171.8g. Thus, there will be no pressure on the pam when implementing single-hand operations.

Also, our protagonist is available in four colorways – pink, ice blue, black, and white.

The Xiaomi Civi 2 has a 6.55-inch 3D flexible AMOLED screen with a pill hole on the front. The display comes with a 120Hz high refresh rate, P3 color gamut, 10bit color depth, and Dolby Vision. Besides, it supports 1920Hz high-frequency PWM adjustment. This very important feature provides a more comfortable experience when used at night.

Biggest Highlight of Xiaomi Civi 2

The biggest highlight of the phone is that it has the most powerful front-facing imaging system in Xiaomi’s history. As you guessed, the camera module is hidden in a pill-shaped hole. There are two 32-megapixel cameras. Both are primary cameras that can even achieve SLR-level portrait blur.

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Among them, the wide-angle lens has a 1.6um large pixel size and an f/2.0 large aperture. The latter increases the light input by 50% compared with the previous generation. Plus, it comes with the ALD coating and lens inking technology. It can be found on the rear cameras of flagship phones. The purpose of the technology is to reduce the ghosting and glare of nighttime selfies. At the same time, the front-facing camera supports AF autofocus. Thus, it can shoot selfies faster.

The ultra-wide-angle lens has a 100° ultra-wide viewing angle. Simply put, when taking selfies with many people, they all will appear in the photo. Plus, it allows users to get a selfie-like performance when recording videos. You know, there is the so-called “shorthand” problem when taking videos with the front camera. As a result, our faces are displayed bigger. The Xiaomi Civi 2 solved this problem as well.

The phone comes with a dual-color temperature flash in the top bezel. So you can take bright and beautiful selfies anytime, anywhere.

Primary Camera

The rear camera module got tons of improvements as well. Now, it includes a 50-megapixel Sony IMX766 1/1.56″ outsole. The latter increases the amount of light by 101.8% compared with the previous generation. There is also a 20-megapixel 115° ultra-wide-angle lens.

Hardware and Performance

This is the first smartphone in China to come with the new Snapdragon 7 Gen 1 chip. It can provide outstanding performance. However, this is not surprising because it inherits core 8 major modules from the Snapdragon 8 series flagship processor. The overall performance is much better in comparison to the Snapdragon 778G. Apart from improving the CPU performance by 10%, the GPU performance increased by 20%, and the AI performance increased by 30%.

Though we are talking about a slim smartphone, the company has managed to put a large 4500mAh 4.48V high-voltage lithium cobalt oxide chemical system battery inside. This is the same battery that we found on the Mi 12S. At the same time, it supports a 67W wired fast charging. In effect, the battery will reach 100% of power in 40% minutes only.

Xiaomi Civi 2 Price and Availability

There are three versions of the Xiaomi Civi 2 we can choose from. The 8+128GB is available for 2399 yuan ($334), the 8+256GB model for 2499 yuan ($348), and the 12+256GB variant for 2799 yuan ($390).

What Is An Interjection?

An interjection is a word or phrase used to express a feeling or to request or demand something. While interjections are a part of speech, they are not grammatically connected to other parts of a sentence.

Interjections are common in everyday speech and informal writing. While some interjections such as “well” and “indeed” are acceptable in formal conversation, it’s best to avoid interjections in formal or academic writing.

Examples: Interjections in a sentenceWow! That bird is huge.

Uh-oh. I forgot to get gas.

We’re not lost. We just need to go, um, this way.

Psst, what’s the answer to number four?

How are interjections used in sentences?

Interjections add meaning to a sentence or context by expressing a feeling, making a demand, or emphasizing a thought.

Interjections can be either a single word or a phrase, and they can be used on their own or as part of a sentence.

Examples: Uses of interjections Phew!

Shoot, I’ve broken a nail.

Oh really? I didn’t know that.

As interjections are a grammatically independent part of speech, they can often be excluded from a sentence without impacting its meaning.

Examples: Sentences with and without interjections

Oh boy, I’m tired.

I’m tired.

Ouch! That hurts!

That hurts!

Primary interjections

A primary interjection is a word or sound that can only be used as an interjection. Primary interjections do not have alternative meanings and can’t function as another part of speech (i.e., noun, verb, or adjective).

Primary interjections are typically just sounds without a clear etymology. As such, while they sometimes have standard spellings, a single interjection may be written in different ways (e.g., “um-hum” or “mm-hmm”).

Examples: Primary interjections in a sentenceUgh! That’s disgusting.

Um-hum. I think that could work.

We won the game. Yippee!

Secondary interjections

A secondary interjection is a word that is typically used as another part of speech (such as a noun, verb, or adjective) that can also be used as an interjection.

Examples: Secondary interjections in a sentence

Goodness

! That was a close one.

Shoot! My flight has been canceled.

Awesome! Do that trick again.

Volitive interjections

A volitive interjection is used to give a command or make a request. For example, the volitive interjection “shh” or “shush” is used to command someone to be quiet.

Examples: Volitive interjections in a sentenceShh! I can’t focus when you’re singing.

Psst. Pass me an eraser.

Ahem. Please pay attention.

Emotive interjections

An emotive interjection is used to express an emotion or to indicate a reaction to something. For example, the emotive interjection “ew” is used to express disgust.

Curse words, also called expletives, are commonly used (in informal contexts) as emotive interjections to express frustration or anger.

Examples: Emotive interjections in a sentenceEw. I’m not eating that.

Yay! I’m so excited to see you.

Yum! This apple pie is delicious.

Cognitive interjections

A cognitive interjection is used to express a thought or indicate a thought process. For example, the cognitive interjection “um” can express confusion or indicate that the speaker is thinking.

Examples: Cognitive interjections in a sentenceUm, can you explain it once more?

Wow! I wasn’t expecting that.

Eureka! I’ve solved the puzzle.

Greetings and parting words

Greetings and parting words/phrases are interjections used to acknowledge or welcome someone or to express good wishes at the end of a conversation.

Examples: Greetings and parting words/phrases in a sentenceHey!

Hello! It’s good to see you.

Bye!

See you soon! Drive safe.

Interjections and punctuation

How an interjection is punctuated depends on the context and the intensity of the emotion or thought being expressed.

Exclamation points are most commonly used along with interjections to emphasize the intensity of an emotion, thought, or demand.

When the emotion or thought being expressed is less extreme, an interjection can also be followed by a period. If an interjection is used to express uncertainty or to ask a question, it should be followed by a question mark.

Examples: Interjections and punctuationOh. I don’t know.

We’ve just won the lottery. Hurray!

Hmm?

When an interjection is used as part of a sentence, it should be set off from the rest of the sentence using commas.

Examples: Interjections within a sentenceHmm, how are we going to do this?

It was an interesting lecture, indeed.

The project is, uh, going well.

Other interesting language articles

If you want to know more about nouns, pronouns, verbs, and other parts of speech, make sure to check out some of our other language articles with explanations and examples.

Frequently asked questions Sources in this article

We strongly encourage students to use sources in their work. You can cite our article (APA Style) or take a deep dive into the articles below.

This Scribbr article

Ryan, E. Retrieved July 19, 2023,

Cite this article

Sources

Aarts, B. (2011). Oxford modern English grammar. Oxford University Press.

Butterfield, J. (Ed.). (2024). Fowler’s dictionary of modern English usage (4th ed.). Oxford University Press.

Show all sources (3)

Garner, B. A. (2024). Garner’s modern English usage (4th ed.). Oxford University Press.

How To Write An Android Cpu Benchmark Tool (Part 2)

MD5 encryption

Code

private String MD5Value;

Code

public void computeMD5Hash(String password) { try { MessageDigest digest = java.security.MessageDigest.getInstance("MD5"); digest.update(password.getBytes()); byte messageDigest[] = digest.digest(); StringBuffer MD5Hash = new StringBuffer(); for (int i = 0; i < messageDigest.length; i++) { String h = Integer.toHexString(0xFF & messageDigest[i]); while (h.length() < 2) h = "0" + h; MD5Hash.append(h); } MD5Value = MD5Hash.toString(); } catch (NoSuchAlgorithmException e) { Log.e("Benchmark", "Error initializing MD5"); } tsLong = System.nanoTime();

for

(Integer i =

0

; i<

20000

; i++) { computeSHAHash(teststring); } Long ttLong = System.nanoTime() - tsLong; tt = ttLong.toString(); Integer roundnumber = /

100000000

); String score = roundnumber.toString(); output =

"SHA-1 hash: "

+ HashValue +

"n Time Taken: "

+ tt +

"n Score: "

+ score; result.settext(output); tsLong = System.nanoTime(); for (Integer i = 0; i<20000; i++) { computeSHAHash(teststring); } Long ttLong = System.nanoTime() - tsLong; tt = ttLong.toString(); tsLong = System.nanoTime(); for (Integer i = 0; i<20000; i++) { computeMD5Hash(teststring); } Long ttLong2 = System.nanoTime() - tsLong; tt2 = ttLong2.toString(); Integer floor = Math.round(ttLong / 100000000); Integer floor2 = Math.round(ttLong2 / 100000000); Integer total = (floor + floor2) / 2; String score = total.toString(); output = "SHA-1 hash: " + HashValue + "n Time Taken: " + tt + "n n MD5 Hash: " + MD5Value + "n Time Taken: " + tt2 + "n Score: " + score; result.setText(output); }

Give it a go and you should find that both functions take about the same amount of time. But by taking an average of both, we should have a somewhat more reliable estimate of CPU performance. In other words, the score should now vary less from one attempt to the next.

Brute force attacks, AKA counting

Okay, that was fun. But really we’re cheating seeing as we didn’t write the algorithm ourselves. What could we come up with that would be a suitable test for our device?

Well, how about trying to crack a password? When we discussed SHA-1 last time, we mentioned that it was now possible to decrypt SHA-1. How? By guessing. In other words, the computer guesses every single combination until it comes across the correct solution. This is called a ‘brute force attack’.

This is also how some hackers steal your password. Let’s say you have a PIN code that is made up of four numbers. This means that there are 10^4 possible solutions, AKA 10 x 10 x 10 x 10 or 10,000. That’s because there are ten possible positions for each digit (0-9). If a program were trying to hack your PIN code, then it could do so very quickly by simply going through each possible combination in order: 0000,0001,0002,0003 all the way up to 9999.

Code

Integer code = 99999; for (Integer i = 0; i < code; i++) {

Code

Integer successfulcode = 0; for (Integer i = 0; i < code; i++) { successfulcode = i; tsLong = System.nanoTime(); for (Integer i = 0; i<20000; i++) { computeSHAHash(teststring); } Long ttLong = System.nanoTime() - tsLong; tt = ttLong.toString(); tsLong = System.nanoTime(); for (Integer i = 0; i<20000; i++) { computeMD5Hash(teststring); } Long ttLong2 = System.nanoTime() - tsLong; tt2 = ttLong2.toString(); tsLong = System.nanoTime(); bruteForce(); Long ttLong3 = System.nanoTime() - tsLong; tt3 = ttLong3.toString(); Integer floor = Math.round(ttLong / 100000000); Integer floor2 = Math.round(ttLong2 / 100000000); Integer floor3 = Math.round(ttLong3 / 100000000); Integer total = (floor + floor2 + floor3) / 3; String score = total.toString(); output = "SHA-1 hash: " + HashValue + "n Time Taken: " + tt + "n n MD5 Hash: " + MD5Value + "n Time Taken: " + tt2 + "n n Code Broken: 9999999 n Time Taken: " + tt3 + "n n n Score: " + score; result.setText(output);

Code

Runnable r = new Runnable() { public void run() { Integer successfulcode = 0; for (Integer i = 0; i < code; i++) { successfulcode = i; } } };

Think of this a little like a class in that it won’t run until we tell it to. Now we just have to create our thread, put the runnable (r) inside it and then tell it to start:

Code

Thread newThread = new Thread(r);

Code

import android.os.Handler; import android.os.Message;

Next, add this somewhere on the main thread:

Code

Handler handler = new Handler() { @Override public void handleMessage (Message msg) { result.setText("Brute Force Complete!"); } };

Because the handler is within the main thread, it can change your UI and your shared variables. Better yet, it’s also possible to call the handler from inside the runnable. Just add this line once the loop is finished:

Code

handler.sendEmptyMessage(0);

Now anything inside the handler will happen once the loop has finished; in this case that means the text will be updated to inform us that the process is over. And we could work out how long the loop takes that way by taking the time before the loop begins and after it messages the handler.

But that wouldn’t be a very efficient way of doing things. Much better would be to send a message to the handler that would contain the time the process took. We’d do this like so:

Code

Runnable r = new Runnable() { public void run() { Long tsLong3 = System.nanoTime(); Integer successfulcode = 0; for (Integer i = 0; i < code; i++) { successfulcode = i; } Long ttLong3 = System.nanoTime() - tsLong3; Message msg = Message.obtain(); chúng tôi = ttLong3; msg.setTarget(handler); if (successfulcode != 0) { msg.sendToTarget(); } } }; Thread newThread = new Thread(r); newThread.start(); }

We’re simply taking the time before the loop runs and after, then converting the variable that creates into a message to send to the handler. It looks lengthy but this is all you’ll need to use to send strings, numbers and more out.

You’ll also notice that sending the message to the handler is dependent on us finding the correct code. This is just to make extra certain that the loop doesn’t get optimized out.

The handler then needs to receive and interpret that message, which it can do like so:

Code

Handler handler = new Handler() { @Override public void handleMessage (Message msg) { final Long tt3 = (Long) msg.obj; result.setText("Brute Force Complete! Time Taken: " + tt3.toString()); } };

So it’s just receiving the message, converting it to the long tt3 and then showing it on our button.

Like I said, this is easiest to understand if make bruteForce the only thing that our app does. So other than the variables and imports, all you need to make this work is:

Code

protected void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) { super.onCreate(savedInstanceState); setContentView(R.layout.activity_benchmark); compute = (Button) findViewById(R.id.btn1); result = (TextView) findViewById(R.id.textView2); teststring = getResources().getString(R.string.teststring); } bruteForce(); } Handler handler = new Handler() { @Override public void handleMessage (Message msg) { final Long tt3 = (Long) msg.obj; result.setText("Brute Force Complete! Time Taken: " + tt3.toString()); } }; public void bruteForce() {

Code

Runnable r = new Runnable() { public void run() { Long tsLong3 = System.nanoTime(); Integer successfulcode = 0; for (Integer i = 0; i < code; i++) { successfulcode = i; } Long ttLong3 = System.nanoTime() - tsLong3; Message msg = Message.obtain(); chúng tôi = ttLong3; msg.setTarget(handler); if (successfulcode != 0) { msg.sendToTarget(); } } }; Thread newThread = new Thread(r); newThread.start(); }

Closing notes

How To Livestream An Event For All Your Friends And Family

Live streaming? Easy. Grab your phone, open Instagram, and go live. Doing it well? Harder—but doable.

Take my brother’s wedding, for example. He married his fiancée (from Alabama) in Ireland (in case my byline isn’t enough of a hint, we’re Irish) during the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic. Even in the best of times, there would have been a huge number of important friends and family around the world who couldn’t physically attend the event. But with travel and gathering restrictions in place in Ireland, limits on international travel, and other more individualized issues, more than three times as many people were prepared to tune in online as would actually be there. The livestream couldn’t be an afterthought—it was the main event for most people.

At some point, this is likely to be the case for you. Whether it’s a wedding, funeral, birthday celebration, holiday gathering, or something else, getting the livestream right will be crucial.

It’s all about the sound

The most important part of a livestream isn’t the video, it’s the sound. Just think of all the blurry, low-resolution YouTube videos and questionably-procured episodes of TV you’ve watched over the years. It’s much more important to hear the bride and groom make their vows than to see it happen in 4K HDR.

For the best sound quality, you’ll need a dedicated directional microphone placed close to wherever people will be speaking. The microphone built into your computer, webcam, or smartphone won’t cut it; it will pick up too much noise from the environment, and there’s no workaround.

You can get fancy and use wireless lapel mics or other more elaborate options, but it’s hard to beat a good USB microphone on a long cable. The two I recommend are the Blue Snowball and the Blue Yeti.

If you’ve ever listened to a podcast, watched someone stream on Twitch, or learned something from a screencast, there’s a large chance you’ve heard one of these two microphones in action. The Snowball costs less, at around $70, while the Yeti is a step up but costs $130. Crucially, both have different “pattern modes” which control the direction of their sound pickup. The cardioid pattern, which is the one you should use, only picks up sound from sources directly in front of the microphone. In other words, put the mic on the dinner table in front of the speaker, and even if the crowd around them hoops and hollers, you’ll still get decent audio.

OK, video matters too

With a good audio setup, you can get away with a lot of video sins. Seriously: You can connect a Blue Yeti directly to your smartphone (you may need a USB-C-to-USB-A or Lightning-to-USB-A adapter, depending on your phone) and have a livestream that’s far better than most one-on-one Zoom calls.

Still, you can make things even better without a huge amount of effort.

First up: the camera you’re recording with. You can connect a modern DSLR or a mirrorless camera to your computer and use it as a webcam, but I don’t recommend it. They’re not designed for recording long, continuous video, so they can overheat, run out of battery, or fall victim to a number of issues. If you know what you’re doing, it can work, but for most people, the bump in video quality will be offset by a lot of extra stress and failure.

Ultimately, the best camera will be your smartphone. You can, as I suggested earlier, wire a mic straight in, but it’s better to use your phone as a webcam connected to a computer. There are quite a few apps that let you do this:

Camo Pro: This is what I went with. It started as an Apple-only service, but you can now use it with Android and Windows devices as well. It’s also one of the most expensive options, at $5 a month, $40 a year, or $80 forever. However, the Camo Studio app gives you a huge amount of control over the video feed, which I wanted.

EpocCam Pro: This is a less-expensive option at $8, and it works with any iOS device connected to a PC or a Mac.

DroidCamX Pro: This is only $5, and it connects both Android and iOS devices to Windows or Linux PCs.

[Related: Gear to make better movies on your smartphone]

You can hold your smartphone yourself, but a stable tripod is better. If you already have one, you can get a tripod mount for your phone. Otherwise, any phone tripod will do—as long as you can place the smartphone where you want. Worst comes to worst, prop it up higher with a chair.

Choose your streaming platform

With the hardware side of things set up, it’s time to broadcast to the world. There are plenty of streaming options, and which one you choose depends on what features you need and where your audience is.

I went with Zoom’s Video Webinar. It was overkill and pricey, at $40 a month for up to 100 attendees, but Zoom’s offerings have changed since then. Now, you can host a 100-person event on Zoom One Pro for $15 a month, or livestream to 300 people for $20 a month. There’s a free version, but you can’t stream for more than 40 minutes. Zoom Webinars are now $80 a month for a minimum of 500 attendees.

Overall, Zoom gave me a lot of control over how people viewed the stream, most people were already familiar with it, and I needed something bulletproof since my brother is only getting married once. As a bonus, I was able to record a local copy of the event and see everyone’s in-person and Zoom chat reactions.

If most of your audience or guests are on Facebook, YouTube, or Twitch, those platforms’ livestreaming options are good, but you may have to jump through some hoops to get set up. Don’t count on them on short notice.

Also, be aware that no matter where you host the stream, you are probably running afoul of copyright laws if you play any music. For a private event, copyright owners are unlikely to notice or shut everything down mid-event, but don’t use the tips in this article to broadcast a bootleg concert to thousands of people. And they can still punish you afterward.

Test, test, test

The time to test everything (and I mean everything) is not the day of the event. Instead, make sure everything is working at least a day or two beforehand so you can fix any of the (almost inevitable) bugs, problems, and other weird issues.

A non-exhaustive dry-run checklist includes ensuring that:

In other words, thorough troubleshooting and preparation should ensure things go off without a hitch.

Going live

When the day of the event rolls ‘round, you should be confident that it’s going to go well, the online guests should know what to expect, and there should be no last-minute scrambles.

With that said, make sure you give yourself enough time to set everything up (if you can’t leave it set up from the tests you did the day before).

Some key things to bear in mind as you get ready to start the stream:

Finally, try to relax and have fun. Setting up a livestream—especially if you haven’t done so before—can be stressful, but you’ve got this.

This story has been updated. It was originally published on November 25, 2023.

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